The Kampala Convention and its Contributions to International Law by Mehari Taddele MaruThe Kampala Convention and its Contributions to International Law by Mehari Taddele Maru

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Veronica P. Fynn, PhD(c), LLB(c), LLM, MPH

Abstract

On 26 January 2015, the early mornings of BBC News – Africa reads, “LRA commander Dominic Ongwen appears before ICC in The Hague.” Ongwen, who was abducted in 1988 at the age of 14 by the Lord Resistance Army (LRA) turned himself in the Central African Republic (CAR) 10 years after he was charged by the International Criminal Court (ICC). The arrest was supported by the Ugandan government; having finally given approval for Ongwen to be tried. Alleged of being Deputy to LRA commander Joseph Kony, Ongwen is accused of committing atrocities against civilians in Uganda and parts of the CAR, South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), including attacks on internal displaced people (IDPs) camps in Uganda, BBC writes. The onset of Ongwen’s case comes with the publication of Mehari Taddele Maru’s book: The Kampala Convention and its Contributions to International Law, part. In his book, Maru asserts the role of the African Union as a trendsetter in international law having established the first ever Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa (2009) (hereafter the Kampala Convention). Maru argues that, since violent conflict and mass displacement of civilians are the major root causes of forced displacement in Africa, the relevance of the Kampala Convention is key particularly regarding preventing, protecting and devising durable solution for the internally displaced.

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Book Reviews